Schedule — Spring 2015

Week 1 – Introduction to the Course and Romanticism (Vol. 2A)

M 1/12

  • What is youth, and what are the main issues facing it?

W 1/14

  • “Tintern Abbey” (1798) by William Wordsworth (pp. 429-433)
  • See Thomas Girtin’s painting of Tintern Abbey (p.2)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs): What is Wordsworth’s primary message about youth in “Tintern Abbey”? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

F 1/16

  • 1st paragraph of Preface (p. xxvii)
  • Data tables and timeline of The Romantic Period (pp. 3-6)
  • First two sections of The Romantics and Their Contemporaries (pp. 7-14)
  • From Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus (1818) (pp. ) by Mary Wolstonecraft Shelley (pp. 757-758)

Week 2 – Youth Poets and the Sublime

M 1/19 — NO CLASS: MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY

W 1/21

  • Perspectives and selections from Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (pp. 37-43)
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley: introduction (pp. 868-870), “Mont Blanc” (1816) (pp. 871-875), and “Ozymandias” (1818) (p. 877)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs): Given that Shelley was around 24 years old when he wrote “Mont Blanc,” how might the poem’s sublimity function as an expression of his youth?

F 1/23

  • John Keats: introduction (pp. 973-975), the Odes of 1819 (pp. 1003-1004), and “Ode to a Nightingale” (1819) (pp. 1006-1008)

Week 3 – French Revolution & Rights of Man/Woman

M 1/26

  • Perspectives: The Rights of Man and the Revolution Controversey (p. 108)
  • Helen Maria Williams, “from Letters Written in France, in the Summer of 1790” (pp. 108-113)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs): What aspects of the festivities described by Williams seem related to youth?

W 1/28

  • Edmund Burke, from “Reflections on the Revolution in France” (1790) (pp. 113-122)

F 1/30

  • The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women (pp. 302-304)
  • Mary Wollstonecraft, “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” (1792): introduction and Chapters 1 & 2 (pp. 304-319)
  • William Godwin, “Evils of Cohabitation—and Marriage” (pp. 147-149)
  • Due: Paper 1

Week 4 – Abolition of Slavery & Romanticism Roundup

M 2/2

  • The Abolition of Slavery and the Slave Trade (pp. 229-230)
  • Olaudah Equiano, from “The Interesting Narrative…” (1789) (pp. 230-239)

W 2/4

  • Romanticism roundup/test prep

F 2/6

  • Test 1: The Romantics

Week 5 – The Victorians and Industry (Vol. 2B)

M 2/9

  • Data tables and introductory material (pp. 1044-73)
  • See cartoon by John Leech, “Horseman pursued by a train engine named ‘Time’” (p. 1089)
  • Fanny Kemble, from “Record of a Girlhood” (1830) (pp. 1091-92)

W 2/11

  • Henry Mayhew, Intro and selections from London Labour and the London Poor (1849/1862) (pp. 1108-1113)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) GROUP B POSTS; GROUP A RESPONDS: What can you glean from Mayhew’s account about youth in the Victorian industrial/urban context?

F 2/13

  • Friedrich Engels, Intro and selections from The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844 (1845) (pp. 1101-1108)

Week 6 – Women and Self Discovery

M 2/16

  • Lord Alfred Tennyson, Intro (pp. 1175-1178) and “The Lady of Shallott” (1842) (pp. 1181-85)

W 2/18

  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Intro (pp. 1138-1140), and selections from Aurora Leigh (1856) (pp. 1155-1162)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) GROUP A POSTS; GROUP B RESPONDS — Would you say the portrayal of Aurora Leigh’s youth is mostly Romantic or mostly something else? Why?

F 2/20

  • Aurora Leigh (pp. 1162-1174)
  • Christina Rossetti, “Promises Like Pie-Crust” (1861/96) (p. 1664)

Week 7 – Science and Social Experience

M 2/23

  • Charles Darwin, Intro and selections from The Voyage of the Beagle, (pp. 1260-72)

W 2/25

  • Darwin, selections from On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection and The Descent of Man (pp. 1272-83)

F 2/27

  • Elizabeth Gaskell, Intro and “Our Society at Cranford” (1853) (pp. 1432-47)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) GROUP B POSTS; GROUP A RESPONDS – Does “Our Society at Cranford” make an argument about youth through the lens of evolutionary theory?

Week 8 – Fin de Siècle Decadence & Aestheticism

M 3/2

  • Prefatory Material (pp. 1885-88)
  • Oscar Wilde, Intro (pp. 1818-1821), Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray (pp. 1828-29), The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), Act I (pp. 1829-1844)
  • Due: Paper 2.

W 3/4

  • Earnest , Act II (pp. 1844-1869)
  • Victorian Roundup/test prep

F 3/6

  • Test 2: The Victorians

Week 9 – Modernism

M 3/9

  • Prefatory Material: “The Twentieth Century and Beyond” (pp. 1918-1938)
  • Ezra Pound, “In a Station of the Metro”

W 3/11

  • S. Eliot, Intro and “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (1915) (pp. 2284-91)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) GROUP A POSTS; GROUP B RESPONDS: In what ways is “Prufrock” an expression of youth?

F 3/13

  • James Joyce, Intro and “Araby” from Dubliners (1916) (pp. 2215-2222)

Week 10 – NO CLASS: SPRING BREAK

Week 11 – Avant-Garde Periodicals

M 3/23

  • Look through all of the first issue of BLAST magazine (http://modjourn.org/render.php?id=1158591480633184&view=mjp_object), but read in particular “Long Live the Vortex!” (pp. 7-8, right after the table of contents) and “Manifesto” 1 & 2 (pp. 11-43).
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) — GROUP B POSTS; GROUP A RESPONDS: What, if anything, seems youthful about BLAST?

W 3/25BLAST (con’t)

F 3/27

Week 12 – WWI

M 3/30

  • Perspectives – The Great War: Confronting the Modern (p. 2112)
  • Siegfried Sassoon, Intro, “They,” and “Everyone Sang” (April 1919) (pp. 2130-32)
  • Rupert Brooke, Intro and “The Soldier” (1915) (pp. 2134-37)
  • Teresa Hooley, “A War Film” (1927) (p. 2137)
  • Wilfred Owen, Intro and “Dulce et Decorum Est” (1917) (pp. 2157-61)

W 4/1

  • S. Eliot, The Waste Land (1922) (pp. 2297-2310)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) GROUP A POSTS; GROUP B RESPONDS: What anxieties does The Waste Land seem to have about youth in the aftermath of WWI?

F 4/3

  • The Waste Land (con’t)

Week 13 – End of Empire / WWII

M 4/6

  • Perspectives: World War II and the End of Empire (pp. 2527-28)
  • George Orwell, Intro and “Shooting an Elephant” (1934) (pp. 2566-71)

W 4/8

  • H. Auden, Intro (pp. 2614-15)
  • “September 1, 1939” (1940) (pp. 2619-21)
  • “Musée des Beaux Arts” (1940) (pp. 2621-22)

F 4/10

  • Test 3: The Modernists

Week 14 – Quadrophenia

M 4/13

  • World War II and Its Aftermath (pp. 1938-1948)
  • The Who, Quadrophenia, listening assignment TBD

W 4/15

  • Quodrophenia (con’t)
  • Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) EVERYONE: Say something insightful about youth in Quadrophenia.

F 4/17

  • Quodrophenia (con’t)

Week 15 – Quadrophenia (con’t)

M 4/20

  • Quodrophenia (con’t)

W 4/22

  • Quodrophenia (con’t)

F 4/24

  • Quodrophenia (con’t)

Week 16 – Wrap-up

M 4/27

  • Semester Wrap-up; Exam Prep; Final Paper Due

Final Exam – Date TBA, in our regular classroom