Schedule

Week 1 – Introduction: The Enlightenment and Romanticism

M 8/22

  • Introduction. The Enlightenment and the Romantic Revolution.

W 8/24

  • Selections from Robinson Crusoe (1719) by Daniel Defoe (handout)
  • From Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus (1818) (pp. 692-93) by Mary Wolstonecraft Shelley (pp. 757-58)
  • In-class discussion: Assuming that Defoe is representative of the Enlightenment and Wolstonecraft Shelley is representative of Romanticism, what seem to be the key differences in worldview between these movements? How are these differences reflected in the writing style? What moments in the texts can we cite to back up our points?

F 8/26

  • 1st paragraph of Preface (p. xlvii)
  • Data tables and timeline of The Romantic Period (pp. 3-6)
  • First two sections of The Romantics and Their Contemporaries (pp. 7-14)
    “Lines left upon a seat in a Yew-tree” (handout)
  • Due: Blog post #1 (1-2 paragraphs): What is the most significant way in which “Lines left upon a seat in a Yew-tree” contrasts the Enlightenment sensibility? Be sure to quote a line or phrase from the text to back up your point.

Week 2 – The French Revolution and the Rights of Man/Woman

M 8/29

  • “The French Revolution and Its Reverberations” (pp. 14-19)
  • Helen Maria Williams, “from Letters Written in France, in the Summer of 1790” (pp. 104-09)

W 8/31

  • Edmund Burke, from “Reflections on the Revolution in France” (1790) (pp. 109-18)

F 9/2

  • Perspectives: The Rights of Man and the Revolution Controversey (p. 104)
  • The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women (p. 315)
  • Mary Wollstonecraft, “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” (1792): introduction and Chapters 1 & 2 (pp. 288-303)
  • Due: Blog post #2 (1-2 paragraphs) (Group A): Would you characterize Wollstonecraft’s “Vindication of the Rights of woman” as primarily an Enlightenment or Romantic argument, and why? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

Week 3 – Aesthetics of Romantic Poetry: Picturesque, Sublime, Beautiful

M 9/5 – LABOR DAY – NO CLASS

W 9/7 – The Picturesque

  • “Perspectives: The Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Picturesque” (pp. 34-37)
  • Selections from William Gilpin: Intro and selected essays on the Picturesque and travel (pp. 47-52)
  • Intro to William Wordsworth and Lyrical Ballads (1798) (pp. 371-73)
  • William Wordsworth, “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey” (1798) (pp. 390-94)
  • Spend a long time looking at Thomas Girtin’s painting of Tintern Abbey (p.2) and thinking about it.

F 9/9 – The Sublime and the Beautiful

  • Perspectives and selections from Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (pp. 37-43)
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley: introduction (pp. 773-75) and “Mont Blanc” (1816) (pp. 776-80)
  • Due: Blog post #3 (1-2 paragraphs) (Group B): Name one way in which “Mont Blanc” exemplifies Burke’s ideas on the sublime, and explain how it contributes to the meaning of the poem. Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

Week 4 – Romantic Visions

M 9/12

Samuel Taylor Coleridge:

  • Intro (pp. 557-58)
  • “Kubla Khan” (1797/1816) (pp. 602-04)

W 9/14

Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • “Ozymandias” (1818) (p. 782)

F 9/16

  • John Keats: introduction (pp. 878-80), the Odes of 1819 (pp. 908-09), and “Ode to a Nightingale” (1819) (pp. 911-13)
  • Due: Paper 1

Week 5 – Abolition of Slavery: Enlightenment Meets Romanticism

M 9/19

  • The Abolition of Slavery and the Slave Trade (pp. 214-15)
  • Olaudah Equiano, from “The Interesting Narrative…” (1789) (pp. 215-24)

W 9/21

  • Mary Prince, from “The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave” (1831) (pp. 224-29)

F 9/23

  • Test 1: Romanticism

Week 6 – The Victorians, Industry, and Social Criticism

M 9/26

  • Data tables and introductory material (pp. 1044-55)
  • Perspectives: The Industrial Landscape (pp. 1088-89)
  • See cartoon by John Leech, “Horseman pursued by a train engine named ‘Time’” (p. 1089)
  • Fanny Kemble, from “Record of a Girlhood” (1830) (pp. 1091-92)

W 9/28

  • Friedrich Engels, Intro and selections from The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844 (1845) (pp. 1101-1108)
  • Henry Mayhew, Intro and selections from London Labour and the London Poor (1849/1862) (pp. 1108-1113)
  • Due: Blog post #4 (1-2 paragraphs) (Group A): Pick either Engels or Mayhew and explain how their outlook has elements of both the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

F 9/30

  • “The Age of Doubt,” “The Crisis of Faith,” “The Industrial Catastrophe,” and “The Age of Reform” (pp. 1057-61)

Matthew Arnold

  • Intro (pp. 1557-60)
  • Selections from Culture and Anarchy (1859) (pp. 1595-1604)
  • “Dover Beach” (1851/1867) (p. 1562)

Week 7 – Science and Social Experience

M 10/3

  • Charles Darwin, Intro and selections from The Voyage of the Beagle, (pp. 1260-72)

W 10/5

  • Darwin, selections from On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection and The Descent of Man (pp. 1272-83)

F 10/7

  • Elizabeth Gaskell, Intro and “Our Society at Cranford” (1853) (pp. 1432-47)
  • Due: Blog post #5 (1-2 paragraphs) (Group B): Do you see any elements of Darwin’s theory of evolution in “Our Society at Cranford?” What are they, and how do they contribute to the story’s meaning? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your points.

Week 8 – Women and Self Discovery

M 10/10

  • “The Woman Question” (1061-63)
  • Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Intro (pp. 1175-1178) and “The Lady of Shallott” (1842) (pp. 1181-85)

W 10/12

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

  • Intro (pp. 1138-40)
  • Selections from Aurora Leigh (1856) (pp. 1155-62)

F 10/14

  • Aurora Leigh (pp. 1162-74)

Week 9 – Fin de Siècle

M 10/17

  • “Aestheticism, Decadence, and the Fin de Siècle” (pp. 1885-88)
  • Oscar Wilde, Intro (pp. 1818-1821), The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), Act I (pp. 1829-1844)

W 10/19

  • Earnest, Act II & III (pp. 1844-1869)
  • Due: Paper 2

F 10/21

  • Test 2: The Victorians

Week 10 – Modernism

M 10/24

  • Prefatory Material: “The Twentieth Century and Beyond” (pp. 1918-1938)
  • T.S. Eliot, Intro and “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (1915) (pp. 2284-91)
  • Due: Blog post #6 (1-2 paragraphs) (Group A): What does “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” have in common with Decadence, and in what ways does it diverge from it? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

W 10/26

  • James Joyce, Intro and “Araby” from Dubliners (1916) (pp. 2215-2222)

F 10/28

Week 11 – WWI & Its Aftermath

M 10/31

  • “Perspectives – The Great War: Confronting the Modern” (p. 2112)
  • Rupert Brooke, Intro and “The Soldier” (1915) (pp. 2134-37)
  • Isaac Rosenberg, Intro and “Break of Day in the Trenches” (1916) (pp. 2138-39)
  • Siegfried Sassoon, Intro, “They,” and “Everyone Sang” (April 1919) (pp. 2130-32)
  • Teresa Hooley, “A War Film” (1927) (p. 2137)
  • Wilfred Owen, Intro and “Dulce et Decorum Est” (1917) (pp. 2157-61)

W 11/2

  • T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land (1922) Parts I & II (pp. 2297-2303)
  • Due: Blog post #7 (1-2 paragraphs) (Group B): What anxieties does The Waste Land seem to have about youth in the aftermath of WWI, and how does it use technique (i.e. multiple voices, literary quotation, fragmentation) to express them?

F 11/4

  • The Waste Land Parts III-V (pp. 2303-10)

Week 12 – To the Lighthouse

M 11/7

  • Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (1927) (forward and Part I – The Window, pp. 3-30; chs. I-V)

W 11/9

  • Lighthouse (pp. 30-82; chs. VI-XVI)

F 11/11

  • Lighthouse (pp. 82-124; chs. XVII-XVIII)

Week 13 – To the Lighthouse

M 11/14

  • Lighthouse (Part 2 – Time Passes, pp. 125-43; chs. I-X)
  • Due: Blog post #8 (1-2 paragraphs) (Group A): What does Woolf seem to be doing with time in “Time Passes”: how does it differ from her use of time in Part I, and how does it pertain to the processing of WWI?

W 11/16

  • Lighthouse (Part 3 – The Lighthouse, pp. 145-80; chs. I-VI)

F 11/18

  • Lighthouse (pp. 180-209; chs. VII-XIII)

Week 14 – THANKSGIVING BREAK – NO CLASS

Week 15 – Decline of the Empire; Post-Colonial Voices

M 11/28

  • Perspectives: World War II and the End of Empire (pp. 2527-28)
  • George Orwell, Intro and “Shooting an Elephant” (1934) (pp. 2566-71)

W 11/30

  • V.S. Naipaul, Intro and selections from In a Free State (1969-70) (pp. 2671-84)

F 12/2

  • Derek Walcott, Intro, “A Far Cry from Africa” (1962), and “Volcano” (1976) (pp. 2661-63)
  • Due: Final Paper

Week 16 – Wrap-up

M 12/5

  • Wrap-up & exam prep

Final Exam – Date TBA, in our regular classroom

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