Schedule

PART I: THE FRENCH REVOLUTION & THE RIGHTS OF MAN AND WOMAN

 

Week 1: The French Revolution and Britain

T 1/9

  • Course intro; excerpt from Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe (1719)

R 1/11

  • “The French Revolution and Its Reverberations” (pp. 14-19)
  • Helen Maria Williams, “from Letters Written in France, in the Summer of 1790” (pp. 104-09)

 

Week 2: The French Revolution Con’t

T 1/16

  • Edmund Burke, from “Reflections on the Revolution in France” (1790) (pp. 109-18)

R 1/18

  • Perspectives: The Rights of Man and the Revolution Controversy (p. 104)
  • The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women (p. 315)
  • Mary Wollstonecraft, from “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” (1792): introduction and Chapters 1 & 2 (pp. 288-303)

Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) (Group A) – What do you think is the most significant way in which Wollstonecraft’s “Vindication of the Rights of Woman” is revolutionary? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

 

Week 3: Emancipation

T 1/23

  • The Abolition of Slavery and the Slave Trade (pp. 214-15)
  • Olaudah Equiano, from “The Interesting Narrative…” (1789) (pp. 215-24)

R 1/25

  • “The Woman Question” (pp.1061-63)
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning (pp. 1138-40)
  • Selections from Aurora Leigh (1856) (pp. 1155-62)

Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) (Group B) – What is one revolutionary characteristic that Equiano and Barrett Browning have in common, and what does it say about revolution itself? Be sure to quote from both texts to back up your point.

 

Week 4: New Women Writers

T 1/30

  • Aurora Leigh (pp. 1162-74)

Due: Paper 1

R 2/1

  • Virginia Woolf, Intro and “The Lady in the Looking-Glass: A Reflection” (2334-37)

 

PART II: INDUSTRY & VALUE

 

Week 5: The Industrialization of Britain and its Culture

T 2/6

  • Data tables and introductory material (pp. 1044-55)
  • Perspectives: The Industrial Landscape (pp. 1088-89)
  • See cartoon by John Leech, “Horseman pursued by a train engine named ‘Time’” (p. 1089)
  • Fanny Kemble, from “Record of a Girlhood” (1830) (pp. 1091-92)

R 2/8

  • Intro to William Wordsworth and Lyrical Ballads (1798) (pp. 371-73)
  • William Wordsworth, “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey” (1798) (pp. 390-94)
  • Spend a long time looking at Thomas Girtin’s painting of Tintern Abbey (p.2) and thinking about it.

Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) (Group A) – What strikes you as being revolutionary about either the content or the form of Wordsworth’s poem “Tintern Abbey,” and why? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

 

Week 6: Industrialism’s Underbelly

T 2/13

  • “The Industrial Catastrophe” (pp. 1057-59)
  • Friedrich Engels, Intro and selections from The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844 (1845) (pp. 1101-1108)
  • Henry Mayhew, Intro and selections from London Labour and the London Poor (1849/1862) (pp. 1108-1113)

R 2/15

  • “The Age of Reform” (pp. 1059-61)
  • Matthew Arnold, Intro (pp. 1557-60)
  • Selections from Culture and Anarchy (1859), “Sweetness and Light” and “Doing as One Likes” (pp. 1595-1600)

Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) (Group B) – Is Arnold’s Culture and Anarchy conservative or progressive, and why? Quote and discuss what you consider to be one key example.

 

Week 7: A Sense of Things Ending

T 2/20

  • “Aestheticism, Decadence, and the Fin de Siècle” (pp. 1885-88)
  • Oscar Wilde, Intro (pp. 1818-1821)
  • The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), Act I (pp. 1829-1844)

R 2/22

  • Earnest, Acts II & III (pp. 1844-1869)

Due: Paper 2

 

Week 8: WWI

T 2/27

  • “Perspectives – The Great War: Confronting the Modern” (p. 2112)
  • Glance through all of the first issue of BLAST magazine at The Modernist Journals Project to gain a sense of what’s in it:
  • http://modjourn.org/render.php?id=1158591480633184&view=mjp_object
  • Read in particular “Long Live the Vortex!” (pp. 7-8, right after the table of contents) and “Manifesto” 1 & 2 (pp. 11-43).

Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) (Group A) – What is more revolutionary about BLAST, its content or its technique? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

R 3/1

  • “Perspectives – The Great War: Confronting the Modern” (p. 2112)
  • Rupert Brooke, Intro and “The Soldier” (1915) (pp. 2134-37)
  • Isaac Rosenberg, Intro and “Break of Day in the Trenches” (1916) (pp. 2138-39)
  • Siegfried Sassoon, Intro, “They,” and “Everyone Sang” (April 1919) (pp. 2130-32)
  • Wilfred Owen, Intro and “Dulce et Decorum Est” (1917) (pp. 2157-61)

 

Week 9: Aftermath

T 3/6

  • T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land (1922) Parts I & II (pp. 2297-2303)

R 3/8

  • The Waste Land Parts III-V (pp. 2303-10)

Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) (Group B) – Is The Waste Land revolutionary? Why or why not? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

 

PART III: NATION & EMPIRE

 

Week 10: Rise of the British Empire

T 3/13

  • “The Age of Empire” (pp. 1063-1065)
  • Perspectives: Travel and Empire (pp. 1746-48)
  • William Gladstone, from “Our Colonies” (1855), pp. 1758-59

R 3/15

  • Reread the excerpt from Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe
  • Rudyard Kipling, “The White Man’s Burden” (1899) pp. 1776-78

Due: Paper 3

 

Week 11 – SPRING BREAK

 

Week 12: Science & Empire

T 3/27

  • “The Age of Doubt,” “The Crisis of Faith,” (1055-57)
  • Charles Darwin, Intro and selections from The Voyage of the Beagle, (pp. 1260-72)

Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) (Group A) – Why are we reading Darwin in an English course? Be sure to quote from the text to back up your point.

R 3/29

  • Darwin, selections from On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection and The Descent of Man (pp. 1272-83)

 

Week 13: Anti-Colonial Ireland

T 4/3

  • James Joyce, Intro and “Araby” from Dubliners (1916) (pp. 2215-2222)

R 4/5

  • William Butler Yeats – Intro (pp. 2174-77), “Easter 1916” (pp. 2181-83) and “Second Coming” (1921) (p. 2183)

 

Week 14: Things Fall Apart

T 4/10

  • George Orwell, Intro and “Shooting an Elephant” (1934) (pp. 2566-71)

Due: Blog post (1-2 paragraphs) (Group B) – Compare Orwell to one of the Irish writers from last week. What is an insight about the Empire that they provide in common? How does revolutionary animus play into both? Be sure to quote from both texts to back up your point.

R 4/12

 

Week 15: End of Empire. End of a Nation?

T 4/17

R 4/19

  • Derek Walcott, Intro, “A Far Cry from Africa” (1962), and “Volcano” (1976) (pp. 2661-63)

Due: Final Paper

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