Lines left upon a seat in a Yew-tree

As we read “Lines left upon a seat in a Yew-tree,” we clearly see the deep inner thoughts and reflections reminiscent to the Romantic period. It contrasts the Enlightenment by teaching that solidarity and mediation can heal the turmoil that a fast paced world provides. Not only do we as humans need to take the time to have these reflections but we also need to provide ourselves with the correct surroundings in order to reach new levels of realization.  This poem creates wonderful imagery of nature and then teaches us what to do with such a setting near the end. “Instructed that true knowledge leads to love, true dignity abides with him alone who, in the silent hour of inward thought, can still suspect, and still revere himself, In lowliness of heart” (Line 56).

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One thought on “Lines left upon a seat in a Yew-tree

  1. A good summary and use of a quote that backs up your point that the poem “teaches us what to do with such a setting.” You need to take it just one step further, however, and say exactly what that point is. In other words, what does it mean that one should “still revere himself, In lowliness of heart,” and what does communing with nature have to do with it? You need one more sentence or so after the quote in order to really clinch it.

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