Endgame

“Did you never have the curiosity, while I was sleeping, to take off my glasses and look to my eyes”

In Beckett’s play, it is clear that thing are in a state of being dead. There is no emotion, very little human interaction, repetitiveness, and most importantly, a state of being indifferent. These repetitve actions that Hamm and Clov seem to engage in are just something that they have always done, so why now would they question it. This repetitiveness leads ultimately to their indifference. If they care not for why they do something, why would they care about the people and things who do those actions as well? The indifference that they show resembles Eliot’s Waste Land in both the people’s feelings toward each other as well as the absurdity that those actions cause.

In Eliot’s first part in his Waste Land, toward the end the reader is set in the city of London after being taken to the trenches of WWI, and the author remarks, “Unreal City/ Under the brown fog of a winter dawn/ A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many/ I had not thought death had undone so many” [60-63]. The war lead the culture to continue as they were doing, yet inside they were essentially dead. Not concerned for their neighbor, not really even concerned for themselves. Death had undone them; it had undone their feelings, actions, and life.

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2 thoughts on “Endgame

  1. I totally agree with your first paragraph. I didn’t make the connection between not caring about why they do something and not caring about other people, but I think it’s true. If you don’t care about what you do then why would you care about what others do.

    • Exactly. Its almost like the “nothing to lose” attitude. If you don’t care about yourself, then you most likely care about no one.

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