Introducing: Aaron Thornburg

Things that stimulate the intellectual side of me: optical illusions, riddles, jazz, poems written by E.E. Cummings, and creative writing, among other things.

I am currently studying to be a Chemical Engineer because I’ve always been adept at math and the sciences and I’ve heard tell that engineers have a fairly solid job placement rate; I am in this British Writers class because I’ve always loved reading and writing. I particularly love any writers who broke out of the traditional mold of writing for the time period and experimented, whether in form, style, or subject matter. The details and nuances that can be expressed via a particular arrangement of 26 individual letters (plus or minus a few symbols here and there) have always struck me as extremely fascinating, and as a result I suppose you could say I enjoy both the linguistics and the literature side of the English language. In terms of what I like to write about, I suppose I’d have to say that I prefer to travel back to the days when a person’s mouth was the only radio around: I like to tell stories. I hope to get out of this class a deeper appreciation for classic literature, as well as a better ability to analyze and interpret each text at a higher level.

In addition to the engineering and literature, I enjoy music. I’ve played the piano for quite a while now and also dabble in clarinet and harmonica. I also run cross country and track here for TU.

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One thought on “Introducing: Aaron Thornburg

  1. The chemical engineer in you might enjoy The Jabberwocky Engine, if you haven’t seen it already (http://www.poemsthatgo.com/gallery/winter2004/jabber/index.htm#). It forms nonsense words based on the probability of phoneme conjunctions in the English language, taken from principles of chemistry. Many of the writers we look at here stand out because they broke molds of some sort, but the modernist period (early 20th century) might be particularly interesting to you in that regard. I ran cross country and track as an undergrad as well. Welcome to the course!

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